The Cut Life Podcast
The Cut Life Podcast

Episode · 4 years ago

Ep. 10 Angela Christine Stevens

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Angela Christine Stevens is a celebrity hairstylist, responsible for the daily looks of superstar Eve, co-host of The Talk, and author of "HAIR" a children's book dedicated to heightened self-esteem for young girls as it relates to their hair texture. We also dive into a hot topic discussion around the dos and don'ts of hair weaves, popularity of "IG hairstylists" not always equaling quality work & more!

Highest to hear. A joy and we are back with the CUTLIFE podcast. As always, we talked to the best celebrity stylist in the business. My producer and dear friend, big men, is in the studio as well. Sometimes he talks and sometimes he doesn't, but we shall see what happens today. But on the line I have someone that I've actually admired from afar on social media and I'm all about stalking people and making them come on the show and I'm so glad she could grace us with her presence. Miss Angela Christine Stevens, how are you? I'm great. Thank you so much for having me such an honors I love cut life. So I'm y'all. No, no, we love you. I just love that you always have this young, fresh vibe and I think that we posted, well, I don't think I know that we posted a look that you did on eve for the autism speaks gala, this platinum blond Bob, and I was like, wait, I didn't know she did short hair. Let me find out. I do. I do, but you know, I'm in La for a while and short hair girls aren't really represent in las more of a East coasting right right, I don't get a chance to really exercise my short cut is skilled as much I would like because everybody loves long hair, which I like that too. Right, right. You don't see as much of it on the on the West Coast. But it's funny, though, because with our platform I get DM's and emails all the time from girls in La Looking for stylist that do short hair. I feel like they're out there but they just don't know who to contact and they're not sure, probably because so many people are into long hair that they're just discouraged in finding people. But we know, you...

...know I few key people out there, so we're like, look, we could try to match you with someone that can help you out, but it's funny. Well, at least now that we know and having this conversation, maybe we'll get some more short hair requests going. But I know you are extremely busy anyway. And before we get into the latest projects, because I do want to talk about the fact that you're not only a stylus but you're now an author. Yeah, and I want to get into that, but before we do that, I really just wanted to get to know you and your background and how you even got into the hair industry in the first place. So if you want to tell me your story the beginning of the Angela Christine Brand, I would love to hear it. So I'm always like doing here. I've been into hair since I was a kids. Like I never had long hair because I was always like curling mind, yelling it up, styling it. My mom would let me because she didn't know how to do mone here. So I've always had a knack for it. I was doing I was making money on the side doing braids and high school that I learned how to do we's very early on and then I went to college for a year and then I kind of was just like mom, like I feel like I need to go to Conson College School, and she watched me grow up and be so enthralled in here's my whole life. So she wasn't surprised us. Their supporter and she was basically like well, if you're going to go to Conson college school, you need to go to pivot point. Pivot point is probably one of the most world were now schools because they also make cools and education for most of the other cosmon college school. So that was a big deal. That she pointed me in that direction because I was just going to go to the Conson college school up the street in Chicago or the hood, and I think that probably wouldn't have gotten me as far as getting the right like a really solid education. So from pivot point I just loved hair. I love color, I love its sentence, I love cutting, I love everything about it, and so I found a mentor through one of my high school friends and she was a Loreo educator and she owned the Salon.

So I worked under her and then I branched out and then I started working in the Salon on the South side and I bounced around from a few salons, but I built a really strong clientele early on and I just immerse myself in it and then I came on vacation one day one year to las, probably maybe like three, three or four years after I had been starting in a Salan of Chicago and being in La it just kind of changed my life and changed my perspective on what was available to me because I think traditionally most people don't really know about all the aspects of beauty, especially not back then, because that was right before the instagram era really hit. There was facebook and then twitter was really big, but instagram wasn't really cracking like that. So people didn't really know what was available to them as much. So when I came to La and I've realized I oh, I could be actually going celebrities and I could be w working on TV and film, or I could be doing this and that, it changed my whole perspective on what I thought I wanted to do with my life and I moved. Three months later, I got a job immediately working with Kim Kimball, and from there that's when I really got into like working on set, working with celebrities, because you know, that's Kim's like world, like she's built such a vast career from doing that. And then the second year I was in La we got offered opportunity to do a television show, and so from the TV show that like opened up a crazy amount of other doors for me. I also opened up a salon in the midst of that time, actually before we got on the show, and I was freelancing. I was working with a lot of artists then just kind of getting my feet wet in the industry, and then from there I started a youtube channel and I really we started to enjoy like teaching, the education. I was working with product companies on and off at the time and so I really found a love for that and I just continue to...

...like branch out and try as many fasts of the hair industry as possible. So now I still have a Salne, I still have a salone in West Hollywood. I work there twice a week. I also work with Eve on the talk for yes Monday from Thursday and then I just waunched and created this book in the Children's brand that I'm working on. So it is a lot, but you know, I like to tell people were up and coming like you can do whatever you set your mind to. Just continue to try things and between their life teach you. I love that and I I was actually first introduced to you on when you were on the WE TV la hair show. That's when I first knew who you were and I admired your hustle even on the show, like you just had that spirit of someone that was hungry and was like look, I'm trying to get it done, I'm serious about my craft and I always respected that. And just to you know, like you said, seeing that transition and being on social media a lot more. It kind of helps you connect with people that you don't know in person, but you're able to follow their careers and follow their journey. So I definitely admire how you've continued to transition and to continue to grow. And one of the things that I actually do really love about you, and that how you present your brain, is that I feel like you're almost your own muse, because a lot of times you switch your hair a lot and it's always looks good and you have one of those faces that can almost wear like any style. So I'll look and I'm like, hold on, am I still following the same girl? Because she's got like long red straight, then it's like Wavy, than it's curly, then it's like big chop. Sure, then it might be braids, and it's like you constantly switch it up and I think that's so cool because it's all I just feel like you're your own Muse and you're always trying things, like I'm. I just I have commited issues.

I'm a condit it. So so it's like, when it comes to my hair, I definitely can't commit to one look, and I know that a part of branding yourself and kind of looking to say, but I love doing hair. I love creating different looks and trying things, and I think it also inspires clients to see that their hair fils does a multitude of things. So, you know, initially I don't even know how I got here where I'm at now as far as being natural, all the no team natural big top and everything, because I was totally obsessed with the weeds and wigs for years. But I think I just kind of got tired of that being my only option right and so one of the other things that I've been blessed to do with my career is help create startup companies them. So I worked with this startup company in New York and she wanted to do like an ECO friendly pland with she only ECO friendly products. And you know, she did multi cultural hair, but mainly like in natural style or straight styles, and she wanted to make it like two hours or less. And so through me having a like test products with that concept, I started to grow a new love for like natural hair styling that I didn't necessarily have before. And that same year, I think I just decided to cut all my hair off and for myself and it really has transformed I prospected on hair styling as well. It's just opening up to a another demographic of like hair option. So it's great to be able to evolve. I just love I love changing it up. I love it. No, will stay tune. I think you're absolutely right because you know, as clients to because I'm not a hair style is. Sometimes people think that I am, but I'm not, and so you know, it's a lot of times we look to our stylists for inspiration as well and if we see it on you, were like, Oh, you know, that's a cool style, let me try that or let me get some some variation of it, and I like that you have taken your natural...

...hair journey and used it as some inspiration for your book hair and I saw that also popping up on social media and I was like, okay, what is this, and then you're on like revolt TV and doing like all these appearances and book signings and I really love the concept behind it, but I will love you to, you know, to explain more, because I think it's so important for us to teach young girls and even ourselves as adult women, to embrace our hair. Thank you. Yeah, I honestly I don't really do kids hair. I don't have kids, so the fact that I decided to make a children's with a kind of left field, but the inspiration came from a number of things. Number One, as much as I love weasing the ways, I'm not really happy with the direction. That's the whole funnel and lace movement has gone into. Oh my gosh, please speak on it that kids. The reality of wear lace front and going down frontals every day is that you're going to lose your hair line and unless you have enough foreheads who start to grow up the lace way far in front of your headline, you're going to cause damage regardless. And that's what a lot of people don't realize because of the INSTAGRAM era is like they want this instant gratifications and instant ability to be able to change your looks and go from Falne to purple to paint to long to short, to different textures, and that's all well and good, but honestly, wearing lace is really for people in Television and film right. It's not for the average girl that works at the post office. It's not for the average girl who works at you know, the nurse like is a nurse, or work as a doctor's office like like. The reality of it is that we're doing things for our hair that are not really made for our lifestyle, and the result of that is a lot of women are losing their hair at early ages. Are Losing a hairline, you know,...

...and it gradually happens, so you don't see it over time. But we also have been developing a very unhealthy addiction to weave the WID yes, definitely, and you see it because, you know, considering that we are a short hair site, a lot of times we have seen stylists that do you know, we're so restorative treatments or try to do, you know, big chops and haircuts to help, because there are a lot of women that are losing their hair. And I was even surprised at how young these women are, like early S. I'm thirty four, so I'm looking at it like wow, like why are you losing your hair at this young of an age? And I'm glad that you are speaking on it, because that was my thought as well. I'm like, look, you're not beyond hitting the stage. You don't need to do the same things that performers are doing, you know, for certain purposes, like it's not like you said, it's not. It doesn't fit your lifestyle and it's very damaging and they're not always installed properly or taking off taking off properly, and you know, the hair care and maintenance in between, you know, doing that, and it just seems like it might be like uncomfortable. I don't like a whole lot of things on my head. Maybe that's why I have short hair, because I like freedom. Yeah, definitely. Most most people are willing to sacrifice those basically needs of like freedom or like feeling the most like themselves for this looks this exotic, you know, look that we've been, you know, frontows and every day thing. He is. But honestly, if you look at most copios where they do with transformation and they put them in a wig or whatever, their ends are not trimmed, their hair does not look healthy. No, they're not doing any hair care. It's like the driest hair, the driest like you scalp, you know, and they're just lapping the hair on top and then it's like Wi lie. And so people are gravitating to...

...this unknowingly, not realizing that there's no haircare associated with with these services and so into becoming a prisoner of exactly the weak. Basically, yeah, because then your hair line has started to deteriorate, your scalp is get having all kind of issues, your hair isn't growing, your ends aren't being tramped, so you're split. INS are continuing to split even if the hair is growing, and so you're telling Yourself, Oh, I'm in a protective style, because that's kind of what it is, but your hair is and getting any of the protection, of the benefit of being put away. Having had the scenario where someone's come to you with the damage from improper installations and you had to make them over or help fix the issue, or have you seen it a lot? And now I definitely I've definitely seen it a lot. I don't have as many clients necessarily that have had those types of issues because I don't really I don't really work with like the general public. I mainly just kind of work with the clientele that I've had over the years because I only work a few days a week and right, right I'm right in that in between stage where I'm almost at the point of like not work in a salon anymore. But I know like raisor chick of Atlanta. Yes, yes, she shut up her sheet PABOM, but she posts a lot about praying people, of praying women, of their weeds, and they have all of these plays and falls fills and Allapacia, and I definitely have clients that have Alla Pusia. But there's genetic ALLOCACIA and there's traction allapasia. Right, kinetic allocusia is something that you had to you have to take care of in the beginning stages, when you first start to see it happening, and usually you can't either take medication or you can get services from a German colleges that will help and stop the action. But when it comes to traction Alapacia, that's just something that happens. They's on the care that you get to the hair.

And so yeah, I have seen a lot of young women with traction Allapucia and once that's follow Colet is gone, it won't come back that unless you try to reverse the steps that you're taking your hair care right. So sometimes the look is more important than bringing yourself from that addition. But slutely, and I get in that women love versatility, we all do, but I think it is a matter of consulting a professional that knows what they're doing and can give you realistic expectations to based on what looks you're trying to achieve, because it's like hey, is is a hairstyle worth losing your hair? I don't think so. Well, the issue with hair is everybody think that they have a say. Everybody thinks that they know what proper it's. In the black community, hair is something that we passed down within our home. You know, hair is something, so it's not necessarily respected as much on a professional level the same way medical treatments are. And so what happens is people will go to stylist who they believe our professional because their instagram is popping or because they seen the result of what the work looks like. But that doesn't necessarily guarantee professionalism when it comes to hair care right and maintaining what you had, and there's not really as much for a regulation on that. What are some questions that you would have clients ask perspective hair stylist? Like, say, if someone is like, okay, I'm looking for a stylist and I want to make sure that you know I I'm receiving proper hair care in addition to the style that I want. What are some of those like questions that you would suggest the general public to ask in a consultation to kind of determine, okay, this stylist may know something about how to care for the hair. Well, it's not necessarily even the questions that you ask. Is More of what you see. The stilace you just suggest or doesn't. So if...

...you go, if you're going to someone and yeah, you want to get a funnel because you want on vacation, you wanted to look furn away, whatever, whatever, and Thew you start to love that funnel and that look. They may have done a great job. Then after you take that funnel off, what is your silence recommended? Are they recommending a deep conditioner treatment? Are they recommending some kind of SCALP TREATMENT? Are they recommending that maybe you don't get the funnel next time, that maybe you get you do a little bit of lead out, or they suggesting maybe do a wig instead that you could take on and off and treat the hair? All right, just say that you trim your hair at all, like you know, are they giving a thorough shampoo like a lot of stilets that do funnels and winds and stuff. They don't even shampoo their customers. Are you serious? Yes, it's what. That's like a thing we like, the newer generation I found so all right now, but no, no, you're schooling like, because I didn't know. I didn't realize that. So are they expecting the client to come already washed in condition? Yeah, it's like a thing like Oh, you got to come clean, and they get them out in the hour. You know, they duty huge grades. Don't. Don't monisturize the SCOUTBOARDS. However, don't trim in here, and then they just roto track the rotor funnel glue with town in the front. Joe, the baby here is going to send them out the door and an hour, hour to have and so what you're getting is like, he's quick, like a family line hairstyle without any of the haircre wow, that's crazy. Goes out a part of silence. That's people are going to saying, you want to look up in here and I have no hair, and that's said. Is You. It's like all styling but no maintenance, no hair care, and that's the point of hiring a professional stylist, because if not, you would just be doing it at home, and I think that's what I do love about our platform, is not just about short hair but as a platform that actually promotes the stylist, because I know in the past few years with, you know, heightened social media engagement, it's a lot of focus on DIY, which there's...

...no issue with that. Like, you know, you want to know how to do certain things in between appointments, but then there also are certain things that you probably shouldn't do, let your own. Rightly, when it comes to a chemical or cutting, like you have to be careful and even, you know, installing hair, because there is a certain technique to that, and, you know, even not even just installing it but taking it out, because I've seen people improperly take out we've and it's did cause damage to their hair when they could have, you know, gone to the salon to do that. Yeah, definitely that's something is issue with the nasal hair movement, but people would they decided to go natural, were forced to do your own hair because a lot of professional stylist didn't deem that as something that they wanted to do or didn't really know how to do it and never got educated on it. And so we pushed a lot of natural to learn how to do their own hair at home and a lot of trial and error to because you have to guy you so many different products. It's a lot of words, and then there's this new terminology. Are you for see? Are you three a's, like, okay, you know, becomes overwhelming. It's a whole different world. Yeah, and it's interesting because you know, natural doesn't always equate to healthy and is. It can be natural but dry and brittle and breaking, and you know. So you have tow hair carry is just so very important. Absolutely. What would you say or like your biggest overall hair care tips that you live by, like certain things that you think are important, especially for black hair? Well, going back to your original question about the book, I never got a chance to answer because we side talking about Oh yeah, you know, we can talk about front does and Weaves and lace fronts all day, like I could do it all day, but to kind of answer both questions at the same time. The reason that I made hair was to create a way for us to pass down fundamental information to...

...our next generation of young women while we are also learning it at the same time. So that's why I made it in the children's format is not necessarily just for kids. It's really for kids and their parents, who are probably making a lot of fake when it comes to their own hair gets. But some of the tips that I put in there, like one of the pages it's like hair. It's about braids and just celebrating the fact that we can wear braids, but it said if those braids feel ache or tight, pain is your hair is where it screaming this isn't done right. So, you know, I always go back to the fact that like tyra on like the first using the top model, like told on the girls like yeah, you know, weed, it has to be tight. I remember that because I was like a teenager and it was just the worst information to spread out there publicly for the world, you know, and it's I have down that wrong information. Like braids don't have to be tight in order to be secure. There's a way to do Brady where you don't have to pull at the Scout, which is still creating a secure brave that's going to last week, you know, and that's one piece of information, and I want little girls to know it, is that they don't have to sit there and end this pain, because that pain is an indication that you probably will lose your hair and it sounds, and it's the same thing with relaxers, where it's been passed down that is ready when it burns, and it's like, yeah, no, it's not ready. You're burning your scout when it burns. That's what's happening. It's going to be burning because you're supposed to be based or you're sopposed to use a level of relaxer that work with your hair. Hairtins out. But yeah, we've have found so much wrong information. So that's one thing that I put in the book. Another thing I put in the book is just an importance of moisture, whether it's to oil or whether it's some water, but our hair love moisture and one thing that we've did, you know, you can't deal with a black woman's her hair is with it's like...

Oh, nose into the world right. Really, our hair really likes moisture. Our hair really does like water and even if you're you're not supposed to really shampoo your hair more than like between four or five days or more, but giving your hair that hydration is still really, really good for the hair. So I explain that in a few different ways in the book. Do you prescribe to co washing? Oh Yeah, I definitely do. I didn't have first because I was that's Naty, like I want to clean it here. But when it comes to natural hair you have to co wash in order to keep some of that. That's the moisture that you put in the hair through products over the week. You have to keep that in there so that you can see a more define curl pattern and the hair is softer and more shiny. So a lot of times were curly hair is gets super dry because the natural sea bone from the scalp can't trickle out to the end of the hair, and so that's why you have to add one more to add more Moors. So when it's time to shampoo again, you don't want to take away everything. You add it because you really need it for the end. Absolutely so, once I understood the psychology behind co washing, it definitely does make a difference in the look and feel of natural hair. Now, Co washing for stray styles I don't recommend unless, like, for relaxed hair, you could co wash everyone's no while and then like just remold it and and curling in styles it is really dry, or if it's color treated and you really don't want to strip the color from it, but it just needs to be cleansed. Co Wash has anti microbial oil in it, which means that it's a cleansing oil. Cleansing Agency's still clear the hair and sup with from any debris, but it just doesn't strip the natural oil. Right, right. No, I love that. Is that's very important because, yeah,...

...you can even feel your hair, the difference between when you shampoo it and condition it and just how it feels like. You know, the shampoo gives it that squeaky kind of feeling and then the condition are is softens it. So you can even see right there the difference that it makes. Yere, exactly. I love it and I'm actually looking at a quote that I think is super cute from the book, and it was a caption that you put on your instagrams, as your hair can be moody just like you and me. Sometimes it takes patience to make it happy as can be. I thought that was too cute and he's so true, because some days you're like, I love my hair, it looks amazing, and other days and like, wait a minute, it just looked good yesterday. What happened. But hair kind of does have his own mood and you have to just learn that to go with it, you know. Yeah, that's the whole premise of the book. Is basically the character kilee. She comes home from school and she's like mom, like no, I don't like my hair. It doesn't look like anybody's hair at school and it doesn't look like yours. And I wanted to raise the conversation up between my multi cultural families and like MOMS who are raising daughters who are maybe half black or no, have Latina and they don't have the same hair as their mom, or they might all be black and they just look different right, and her mom basically explains that, like, your hair isn't just this object that's sitting up there. Your hair is it's like a person. And so the story the hair comes to life and I basically really relay all the information and why we should take care of it in a form of like why you should take care of another person. What is another person needs? So the same way that we drink water, your hair needs natural oils of our the same way we might have a good day here, in a bad day here's your hair does the same thing as but the more you learn how to take care of it, the better is going to look and the more you're going to love it. And so that's kind of...

...the premise of the whole book, is to feed those hair care tips in there, but also to have fun with the idea they're like the hair really is a personality and it does all this stuff, especially curly here. You can wear a straight, you can wear curly, you go at the Braids, you can wear foo, the celebration. That like all the options that we have, and then also throw my hair tipps in, but then having a good time with it for kids to really feel like, well, this is fun, like I'm learning, but it doesn't feel like I'm learning, and everyone should know. The illustrations are absolutely amazing. You. I didn't do those. Oh, I know you have a partner that worked with you. Yeah, this name is jq thurrows. He's so talented. We're really excited about the next phase of what we're putting together as far as the book series. But yeah, it's going to be a lot more working on the book for boys because, you know, always have as many questions about theirs. We yes, they do. Yes, yeah, and just a lot of online resources for families to really understand haircare in it easy way. So I'm excited. It's not a work, but you know that's weird to do right. You know, I love it. I love the brand expansion and anyone listening you can purchase hair on pretty curls clubcom or Amazon. That's pretty curls clubcom. And what is Pretty Curl those club? Well, basically, when I initially came up with the concept, the club was going to be Chivy and all the other characters I create, and they're all of different ethnicities, but what binds them together as friends is their big curly hair. And since that idea we've evolved a little bit more into the actual readers wanting to be a part of the club. So now we're building out content and a membership for the readers of hair and the other books to come so that they can feel like they're part of a club and learn more about here and get...

...all the merchant stuff like that too. So I love it. You are as such a boss. I think it's amazing what you're doing and I love that. You know, you've always talked to stylist about ways that they expand their brand and get beyond the chair and I love that you've created this new platform for people to really learn and be engaged and it's impactful for all generations because MOM's obviously, can share it with their daughters, girlfriends can share it with each other, and I think it's really, really amazing what you're doing. And again, anyone listening, pretty curls clubcom and Amazon, we have to purchase and support this book. We're definitely going to post about it on the cut life because we need all of our followers to know about out it and to purchase the series. And I just wanted to thank you, Angela, for joining us on the podcast. I really enjoy talking to you and getting to know you and hopefully I can meet you in person when I get back out to La. Will Happen? You have a lunch and can yeah, definitely, and al I'm everyone that's listening. You can follow Angela Christine on instagram and Angela see styles. That's Angela C stylies and we will talk to you soon. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me. It's always a pleasure and thanks flat any time and when the new book comes out, we want to have you back on so we can talk about it. Oh, for so, for so, the Park Project for day. I love it. I love it. Thank you, thank you. Have a great day you too. Thank you for tuning into the cut life podcast. As always, we talked to the best hair stylist in the business. You can listen to us on soundcloud and itunes and also on live the cut Lifecom, where we post new content daily. Check us on instagram at the cut life. We always have events coming up in the city near you when...

...we want to see you live and in person. And if you have any questions about the podcast or anything as it relates to the cut life, you can email us at Info at live the cut lifecom. That's Info at live the cut lifecom and stay blessed. Until next time.

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